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I am popstar
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venkataramana1987's Avatar
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Default I am popstar - 11-02-2010, 01:51 AM

Hi this my latest digital paintin done in ps cs5.,i spent over 8 hrs on this and all the wip is located at...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GCBcxgtEju4






hope you would comment me something......
I want to become a digital mattepainting artist thats why first i am practicing painting in photoshop,badluck is i have no enough money or age to learn art in a school.

I developing my painting and drawing skills on my own.
but here all I need from you guys is,how to become matte painter,by using this skills along with photosho.?



I am in biggest confusion that how can I do.?



hop you guys help me.


Thank you

VENKAT
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Default 11-02-2010, 08:46 AM

All painting skills, ability to copy photos, composition and colour theory are going to be useful in some way for matte painting.

That being said, I wouldn't have suggested doing a monochrome character study from a photo as practice for matte painting - seems a bit of an odd choice, a bit like like learning to be a tailor by making carpets.

If you want to develop your life drawing skills, go to a figure drawing class and fill some sketch books, and post this image to conceptart.org.

If you want to develop your matte painting skills, start some landscape studies from life. Copy a photo of a landscape WITHOUT using any pressure sensitive brushes at all (this really makes you think about where to place your colours). Do a simple set extension, a simple day-for-night, a simple sky replacement.

DON'T start painting:

>Waterfalls
>Fantasy castles
>Floating or spiky rocks
>Backlit sunset scenes

Hope that helps!

AJ


Head of 3D Digital Matte Painting: MPC Vancouver
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Default 11-02-2010, 09:36 AM

Alex gave you good advice, though I don't think there's anything wrong with back lit scenes, they are very common in movies- back light with a lot of atmospheric perspective.
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Default 11-02-2010, 10:35 AM

Quote:
I don't think there's anything wrong with back lit scenes, they are very common in movies- back light with a lot of atmospheric perspective
That's true, but it's very easy to learn the techniques for doing these kinds of images, and then get 'stuck', only being able to produce good-looking matte paintings when they are backlit. Seems to be a common problem with junior portfolios - maybe we should invent a name for it, and call it the 'sunset trap' or something.

I'd therefore say that producing these kinds of images probably isn't the best use of your time if you are learning.


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Default 11-02-2010, 11:05 AM

Totally agree with Alex. i got stuck in a rut doing backlit images for quite a while, and Alex pointed that out to me and once I changed it up it drastically improved my artistic scope.

N


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Default 11-02-2010, 09:31 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Jenyon View Post
All painting skills, ability to copy photos, composition and colour theory are going to be useful in some way for matte painting.

That being said, I wouldn't have suggested doing a monochrome character study from a photo as practice for matte painting - seems a bit of an odd choice, a bit like like learning to be a tailor by making carpets.

If you want to develop your life drawing skills, go to a figure drawing class and fill some sketch books, and post this image to conceptart.org.

If you want to develop your matte painting skills, start some landscape studies from life. Copy a photo of a landscape WITHOUT using any pressure sensitive brushes at all (this really makes you think about where to place your colours). Do a simple set extension, a simple day-for-night, a simple sky replacement.

DON'T start painting:

>Waterfalls
>Fantasy castles
>Floating or spiky rocks
>Backlit sunset scenes

Hope that helps!

AJ
Quote:
Originally Posted by gfilmman View Post
Alex gave you good advice, though I don't think there's anything wrong with back lit scenes, they are very common in movies- back light with a lot of atmospheric perspective.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alex Jenyon View Post
That's true, but it's very easy to learn the techniques for doing these kinds of images, and then get 'stuck', only being able to produce good-looking matte paintings when they are backlit. Seems to be a common problem with junior portfolios - maybe we should invent a name for it, and call it the 'sunset trap' or something.

I'd therefore say that producing these kinds of images probably isn't the best use of your time if you are learning.
Quote:
Originally Posted by nickmarshallvfx View Post
Totally agree with Alex. i got stuck in a rut doing backlit images for quite a while, and Alex pointed that out to me and once I changed it up it drastically improved my artistic scope.

N




thnks all of you.....now really I understand what is going to be,your lines giving me clear difference between cocept artist and mattepainting artist,till today i thought blindedly about art is main and main.now i realised much from your lines.....its great to take suugetsions from you people.thanks a lot.....hope i will again meet you people with landscape sketches and matte paintings....


gods...bless me to do well


venkat
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Default 11-03-2010, 02:53 PM

Well, I'll agree to disagree on backlit scenes. Side and back light are most common, and I don't think either lighting scenario is easy. Even sunsets require a lot of subtle touches to make them believable, and if you think back light is a rut it's probably because beginners can't do them well enough to be considered good. Maybe my opinion holds no weight as I'm anonymous but if you look at The Hindenburg as an example, and shots by all the greats they use back light to their advantage. I'm not talking about a totally dark foreground, sure that's easy, but designing a shot to use a limited, but clever amount of detail with back light and atmosphere as a key ingredient.

Take care all.
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Default 11-03-2010, 03:15 PM

Quote:
Originally Posted by gfilmman View Post
Well, I'll agree to disagree on backlit scenes. Side and back light are most common, and I don't think either lighting scenario is easy. Even sunsets require a lot of subtle touches to make them believable, and if you think back light is a rut it's probably because beginners can't do them well enough to be considered good. Maybe my opinion holds no weight as I'm anonymous but if you look at The Hindenburg as an example, and shots by all the greats they use back light to their advantage. I'm not talking about a totally dark foreground, sure that's easy, but designing a shot to use a limited, but clever amount of detail with back light and atmosphere as a key ingredient.

Take care all.

Actually, i dont think we need to agree to disagree, coz i would agree with your comments there. The problem is that these backlit images are often considered typically beautiful (and are used a lot in film as a result) so its easy to end up painting no other lighting scenario. And of course the sunset is the pinnacle of the backlit image and often people end up just always painting silhouetted trees/buildings against a pretty sky where you can get away with an awful lot. Id say backlit is ok as long as its not overdone and you have it in your ability to paint other lighting.

N


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Default 02-24-2011, 11:12 AM

Yes, I agree too. Nothing wrong painting dawn and dusk because they are beautiful and captivating. But it is considerable easier then painting a daytime, midday, or a scene with no obvious direct light source, because the contrast is a lot more subtle, and it takes a great deal of observation and colour choice to pull off successfully and realistically.


Franklin Chan - Freelance artist - Matte Painting - Texture Painting - Concept Design - 3D Generalist
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